Our Compensation Estimator

Please use our compensation calculator to find out approximately how much compensation you could be entitled to for your personal injury.

Start by selecting the body part to which you have suffered injury, and then you will be shown the range of compensation payments that can be awarded for the type and severity of the injury you have suffered.

Head Neck Arm Arm Torso Pelvis Forearm Forearm Hand Upper-Legs Hand Lower-Legs Lower-Legs Feet Feet

Hip and Pelvic Area

Accidents happen; following an injury to the hip and pelvic area, these are the approximate levels of compensation you could expect to acheive…

Soft Tissue

Like other sprains, hip sprains are sometimes classified in grades: mild sprains involve some stretching of ligaments; moderate sprains involve partial rupture of a ligament while severe sprains involve complete rupture of a ligament. Groin sprains will also fall into this category

Minor up to €29,600

Moderate - €13,400 to €60,600

Severe and permanent conditions - €60,600 to €70,000

Dislocations

More serious injuries may involve an element of severe ongoing dysfunction as well as a high risk of degenerative change. Severe injuries may require or have had a hip replacement procedure.

Minor - €27,100 to €45,800

Moderate - €45,000 to €70,400

Moderately Severe - €46,300 to €86,700

Severe and permanent conditions €59,800 to €94,500

Fractures – Pelvis

Where the fracture is isolated, i.e. fractured in a single place, the prognosis is usually excellent. Serious and permanent condition pelvic fractures such as those that involve fractures in more than one place and which may cause disruption of the pelvic ring. These may be treated with external or internal fixation via a laparotomy. The fracture may involve complications, such as, and is quite common in males, injuries to the bladder and urethra. In females there can be a risk of complications in childbirth. Other risks to be considered are degenerative changes and the possible need for future surgery, for example hip replacement.

Minor - €27,700 to €54,300

Moderate - €47,100 to €58,400

Moderately Severe - €68,500 to €86,500

Severe and permanent conditions - €79,300 to €94,800

Neck

Accidents happen; following an injury to the neck, these are the approximate levels of compensation you could expect to acheive…

Whiplash/Soft Tissue

The most common type of neck injury is called a “whiplash” injury which is an over extension or sprain often suffered in a motor vehicle accident or high impact slip/trip/fall type of accidents. Whiplash injuries can involve a very minor sprain that heals within days or weeks or they can in extreme cases cause long lasting pain and permanent disability. Sometimes a neck strain can irritate or aggravate a pre-existing condition that may or may not have been treated before the accident. These can include disc lesions, spondylosis, osteoarthritis, spondylolisthesis.

Minor – substantially recovered up to €15,700

Minor – a full recovery expected up to €19,400

Moderate - €20,400 to €30,200

Moderately Severe - €34,400 to €52,200

Severe and permanent - €44,600 to €77,900

Shoulder and Upper Arm

Accidents happen; following an injury to the shoulder and upper arm, these are the approximate levels of compensation you could expect to acheive…

Soft Tissue

This category includes all sprains to the upper arm and shoulder region including partial and complete tears of the tendons forming the joint capsule (the rotator cuff), which may result in substantial reduced capacity. The level and duration of treatment as well as any complications and permanent ongoing disability will dictate the level of compensation.

Minor up to €33,500

Moderate - €22,000 to €60,900

Severe and permanent conditions - €34,700 to €67,700

Dislocation

Shoulder dislocations range from simple dislocations to severe that include ligament and nerve damage. Likewise, the level of treatment can range from placing the arm in a sling to an operative reduction. Once dislocated, the shoulder may be susceptible to further dislocation in the future with the increased risk of degenerative disease as a result.

Minor - €17,500 to €43,200

Moderate - €33,000 to €70,600

Severe and permanent conditions - €48,400 to €76,700

Fracture – Humerus

Fractures of the humerus (upper arm bone) may also be described according to the type of fracture. For example, transverse, oblique, spiral or comminuted. They are most often treated very conservatively by non-surgical means, for example closed reduction and/or cast and sling. Uncommonly, an open reduction operation is necessary. Complications of humerus fractures may include nerve palsy and delayed and nonunion and shoulder joint stiffness. Very occasionally, brachial artery complications may be seen with shaft fractures. Healing times vary with some fractures being slow to heal although this depends upon the degree, if any, of displacement.

Minor up to €36,800

Moderate - €34,700 to €64,500

Severe and permanent conditions - €50,100 to €83,900

Fracture – Humerus

Fracture Clavicle (collar bone) - €22,100 to €44,000

Crush Injury – Arm or Hand

A crush injury is a serious type of soft-tissue injury and may include fracture, vein and nerve damage. Treatment of these major soft-tissue injuries can involve vein repair, nerve repair, debridement, repeated wound irrigations and skin grafts. Amputation may become necessary unless the neurovascular viability of the limb or part thereof is restored. Any associated fractures and other soft tissue damage such as ligament and tendon injuries will also require repair

Minor - €14,400 to €33,300

Moderate - €32,000 to €48,400

Moderately Severe - €43,800 to €69,100

Severe and permanent conditions - €64,200 to €87,700

Back Injuries, Spinal Fractures and Internal Organs

Accidents happen; following an injury to the back, spinal area and internal organs, these are the approximate levels of compensation you could expect to acheive…

Back - Soft Tissue

Serious injuries may involve partial or complete damage to the spinal nerves, serious exacerbation of disc lesions requiring fusing of vertebra, irritation of a spinal nerve root, and those most severe back injuries involving paralysis, or other severe consequences such as loss of sexual function or loss or impairment of urinary or bladder function.

Minor – substantially recovered up to €14,800

Minor – a full recovery expected up to €18,400

Moderate - €21,400 to €34,400

Moderately Severe - €32,100 to €55,700

Severe and permanent - €52,300 to €92,000

Vertebra

This category includes all types of vertebral fractures including fracture dislocations, wedge fractures, chance fractures, burst fractures and flexion tear drop fractures. Wedge spinal fractures are regarded as stable fractures and rarely result in neurological complications. These occur most commonly in the thoracic spine. Burst fractures are regarded as stable fractures but may result in spinal cord involvement if there is bone fragmentation.

Minor - €32,500 to €63,300

Moderate - €54,900 to €92,700

Severe and permanent conditions - €76,000 to €139,000

Rib(s) or Chest Bone Fractures

Although severe pain may follow injury, most rib fractures achieve substantial recovery in a relatively short period of time without treatment. Some may involve ongoing residual permanent condition and some have complications such as a punctured or collapsed lung.

Minor - €13,700 to €45,900

Moderate - €29,600 to €63,400

Severe and permanent conditions - €49,500 to €80,000

Heart

A heart contusion is bruising of the heart muscles. It usually occurs from severe blunt trauma to the chest causing the chest bone to compress the heart against the spinal column. This trauma leads to an alteration in the heart cells fluid composition which in turn leads to an alteration in the hearts electrical activity and abnormal heart rhythm. Clinical signs of contusion are left sided chest pain, rapid heartbeat, shortness of breath, sweating and low blood pressure. Severe heart contusions can result in death and therefore are not included in the assessment category below

Heart Contusion €18,500 to €22,100

Lung Injuries

The vast majority of lung contusion injuries occur in motor vehicle accidents. It occurs usually from blunt trauma and severe decelerating forces. Provided there are no complications and sufficient breathing can be maintained a satisfactory recovery results. Lung lacerations can occur through blunt trauma, penetrating injuries or from injuries to the rib cage. The lung has many veins and as such lacerations may result in profuse bleeding.

Lung Contusion - €15,900 to €21,900

Lung Laceration - €16,000 to €31,700

Punctured/Collapsed Lung

The normal treatment is to use a tube to drain the fluid and air and to keep the lung expanded to prevent it collapsing.

Minor - €14,600 to €17,900

Moderate - €19,900 to €42,100

Severe and permanent conditions - €52,600 to €82,700

Kidneys

Kidney injuries are relatively rare as they are well protected by the ribcage. Most kidney injuries are usually classified as contusions, lacerations, haematomas and ruptures. Contusions are regarded as mild injuries and are treated conservatively with rest and observation. More severe contusions might involve a period of hospitalisation. Antibiotics may also be prescribed. Haematomas are treated conservatively where possible along with observation to ensure the haematoma is not expanding or haemorrhaging, in which case surgical evacuation and bleeding control is required.

Contusion or Haematoma - €13,400 to €28,000

Laceration - €21,300 to €35,000

Bowels and Digestive System

The normal treatment for injuries to the intestines is surgery to open the abdomen (laparotomy). When the damaged area is located, lacerations or perforations are treated by suture or in some cases with a patch. External drainage is done simultaneously. Major damage might require removal of the damaged section and then re-joining the ends. Injuries to the colon include lacerations and bruising within the walls of the colon. Injury can occur to the colon itself or to its mesentery attachment. Blunt and penetrating trauma is the most common causes of injury. Treatment of colon injuries includes primary closure, partial removal and colostomy. Primary closure is used mainly for smaller wounds and involves suture closure. Colostomy is the surgical opening from the colon to the abdominal wall to create an outlet for body waste. Colostomy may be temporary or permanent.

Moderate - €21,300 to €45,900

Temporary Colostomy - €56,800 to €73,000

Severe and permanent conditions - €61,900 to €93,900

Bladder

Bladder injuries, which mostly occur from blunt trauma, are more likely to occur when the bladder is full rather than when it is empty. When empty, the bladder lies behind the pelvis and is therefore well protected by the pelvis but when full it rises up into the lower abdomen and becomes vulnerable to trauma. When empty however it is still vulnerable to injuries such as fractures of the pelvis. Bladder contusions are bruising of the bladder wall. These may sometimes be described as interstitial injuries. Minor bladder contusions require no specific treatment. If blood in the urine is present (hematuria) observation or catheterisation may be required. Severe contusions may even necessitate the use of an indwelling catheter for a number of days. Bladder contusions resolve without any residual urinary dysfunction.

Bladder contusion - €14,200 to €28,500

Where ongoing loss of function is expected - €24,600 to €86,000

Any injury to the Ureter (the tube by which urine passes) - €21,400 to €44,500

Spleen

The spleen is a commonly injured abdominal organ being particularly susceptible to blunt trauma and motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of spleen injuries. The most common types of spleen injury are laceration and rupture. Rupture generally occurs at the time of accident but may also occur at a later rupture. Spleen injuries often occur in association with other injuries such as rib fractures but also frequently occur in isolation.

Haematoma/Laceration €21,300 to €44,700

Total Loss/Severe Loss of Function or Removal up to €73,100

Hernias

A hernia is a forcible protrusion of a body organ or body tissue through another structure. Hernia as an injury in most cases will be encountered as a work related injury suffered through lifting. An inguinal hernia is a herniation in the groin area and is the most common type of hernia; it may be unilateral or bilateral (one sided or both sides). Other types of hernia include femoral hernias, umbilical hernias, parumbilical hernias and ventral hernias. A hernia may also be strangulated (where the blood supply to the protruding organ or tissue has been cut off), obstructed (blocks the intestine), reducible (it can be reduced (pushed back) by manual manipulation) or irreducible/ incarcerated (it cannot be reduced by manual manipulation and as such requires surgical intervention).

Minor up to €25,700

Moderate - €31,400 to €46,000

Severe and permanent conditions - €46,700 to €60,300

Food Poisoning

There are varying degrees of food poisoning and the effects will vary from person to person. Some types of food poisoning will have short term effects whereas other more serious types may have a lasting effect on a person’s appetite and daily living

Minor to Moderate up to €14,500

Severe and permanent conditions - €23,700 to €40,300

Elbow and Forearm

Accidents happen; following an injury to the elbow and forearm, these are the approximate levels of compensation you could expect to acheive…

Soft Tissue

Elbow sprains are typically treated conservatively. Rest, ice packs and heat applications and in some cases temporary immobilisation in a sling or bandage is usually all that is needed. In some injuries, anti-inflammatory medication may be prescribed and physiotherapy may be of some assistance. Elbow sprains generally heal without any residual effects and in this event will fall in either of the lower two brackets dependent on prognosis.

Minor up to €9,200

Moderate - €8,000 to €29,500

Moderately Severe - €22,000 to €59,600

Severe and permanent conditions - €39,900 to €63,900

Dislocation

Some injuries require open reduction of the dislocation rather than the more common closed reduction. Complications can arise where vein damage also occurs due to swelling and the need to hold the elbow in a flexed position following reduction.

Minor - €21,200 to €40,700

Moderate - €37,400 to €70,800

Severe and permanent conditions - €55,400 to €75,300

Fracture – Radius and Ulna Bones

Some injuries require open reduction of the dislocation rather than the more common closed reduction. Complications can arise where vein damage also occurs due to swelling and the need to hold the elbow in a flexed position following reduction.

Minor - €22,100 to €38,300

Moderate - €37,700 to €40,000

Moderately Severe - €39,200 to €81,700

Serious and permanent conditions - €57,200 to €83,700

Hands

Accidents happen; following an injury to the hands, these are the approximate levels of compensation you could expect to acheive…

Soft Tissue

Like other sprains, hand sprains are sometimes classified in grades: mild sprains involve some stretching of ligaments; moderate sprains involve partial rupture of a ligament while severe sprains involve complete rupture of a ligament. The injury may last for several weeks or several months but a full recovery is the most common outcome

Minor up to €21,700

Moderate - €21,900 to €43,700

Severe and permanent conditions - €41,200 to €67,500

Fractures

Fractures to the hand (the metacarpal bone(s)) are described according to the site of the fracture. They may involve the base of the bone, the shaft, or the neck and head.

Minor - €14,600 to €32,200

Moderate - €30,200 to €64,800

Severe and permanent conditions - €49,600 to €67,700

Thumb and Fingers - Soft Tissue

Like other sprains, hand sprains are sometimes classified in grades: mild sprains involve some stretching of ligaments; moderate sprains involve partial rupture of a ligament while severe sprains involve complete rupture of a ligament. Although the injury may last for several months a full recovery is the most common outcome.

Thumb -

Minor up to €21,200

Moderate - €24,100 to €48,700

Severe and permanent conditions - €35,600 to €57,300

Finger(s) -

Minor up to €19,100

Moderate - €21,700 to €40,100

Severe and permanent conditions - €33,800 to €51,300

Dislocation

More severe dislocations may involve the head of the bone protruding into the joint capsule and where closed reduction is not possible and surgical reduction is carried out. Otherwise, it is most common for reduction to be attempted by closed means where the dislocation is manipulated and pushed back into its normal place. A full and complete recovery is the most common outcome for these injuries

Thumb -

Minor - €14,400 to €26,100

Moderate - €28,900 to €50,600

Severe and permanent conditions - €41,400 to €59,000

Finger(s) -

Minor - €12,800 to €22,400

Moderate - €17,300 to €40,700

Severe and permanent conditions - €29,300 to €51,900

Fracture

Most thumb and finger fractures are simple fractures and are treated nonoperatively. In fact some don’t require any treatment at all. Whether the fracture is open (breaks the skin) or closed will have a bearing on the compensation given. Complications such as non-union of fractures are rare but mal-union does sometimes occur with deformity and restriction of function. Post-traumatic arthritis is also a possible late complication.

Thumb -

Minor up to €30,300

Moderate - €29,600 to €46,900

Moderately Severe - €38,600 to €54,900

Severe and permanent conditions - €43,700 to €62,700

Finger(s) -

Minor up to €16,600

Moderate - €19,500 to €44,900

Moderately Severe - €32,800 to €46,200

Severe and permanent conditions - €31,500 to €56,400

Upper Limb Disorders

This category should be used for specific upper Limb Disorders. These injuries may have been caused in the work place due to repetitive movement. The severity and range will depend upon several factors, such as one sided or double-sided symptoms, dominant hand, the ability to work, the effect on domestic and social life, the capacity to avoid recurrence of symptoms, surgery required or performed and age at the time of the injury.

Tenosynovitis (an inflammation of the tendon sheaths) -

Minor €22,000 to €29,400

Moderate €25,900 to €34,400

Moderately Severe €38,700 to €66,500

Severe and permanent conditions €58,000 to €68,600

De Quervains Tenosynovitis (an inflammation of the tendon of the thumb) -

Minor - €17,500 to €18,300

Moderate - €27,800 to €32,800

Moderately Severe - €33,100 to €36,100

Severe and permanent conditions - €43,600 to €47,900

Radial/Cubital Tunnel Syndrome (compression of the radial or ulna nerves) -

Minor - €22,400 to €32,200

Moderate - €29,400 to €40,900

Moderately Severe - €42,400 to €73,300

Severe and permanent conditions - €61,800 to €76,600

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (compression of the median nerve) -

Minor - €22,100 to €32,000

Moderate - €28,300 to €39,700

Moderately Severe - €41,100 to €71,700

Severe and permanent conditions - €60,300 to €74,100

Epicondylitis (Tennis/Golfers Elbow) -

Minor - €18,400 to €19,100

Moderate - €31,800 to €34,700

Moderately Severe - €35,600 to €37,800

Severe and permanent conditions - €47,700 to €51,400

Dermatitis – Arm/Hands

Contact allergic dermatitis is a reaction of the skin to allergens (substances which the body is allergic to). Whilst not confined to the arm and hand, this is the most common area affected. Allergens generally don’t cause skin reactions to most people but some are hypersensitive to the allergens which are usually organic or chemical in nature.

Minor up to €14,000

Moderate - €14,000 to €19,800

Severe and permanent conditions - €32,800 to €53,700

Arm or Hand Amputations

Complicated traumatic amputations are ones involving delayed treatment, delayed healing or major infection. The necessity for stump revision or the existence of phantom limb pains may also occur. An amputation can also be provided as a treatment required due to a severe injury

Loss of Single Digits -

Minor up to €14,000

Index Finger – partial up to €55,800

Index Finger – total up to €61,200

Middle Finger – partial up to €51,100

Middle Finger – total up to €57,200

Ring Finger – partial up to €43,300

Ring Finger – total up to €57,200

Little Finger – partial up to €41,600

Little Finger – total up to €46,400

Thumb – partial up to €44,200

Thumb – total up to €80,500

Upper Legs

Accidents happen; following an injury to the upper legs, these are the approximate levels of compensation you could expect to acheive…

Fractures – Femur

Serious injuries include those where a risk of future arthritis exists and the level of that risk, the recovery period, treatment type and duration and what complications exist, for example fracture non-union or limb shortening. Fractures that involve a joint are usually considered more complicated than others due to the increased impact on limb movement.

Minor - €27,700 to €59,100

Moderate - €47,000 to €84,700

Moderately Severe - €60,600 to €97,700

Severe and permanent conditions - €83,100 to €102,000

Lower Legs

Accidents happen; following an injury to the lower legs, these are the approximate levels of compensation you could expect to acheive…

Knee - Soft Tissue

Knee sprains are sometimes classified in grades: mild sprains involve some stretching of ligaments; moderate sprains involve partial rupture of a ligament while severe sprains involve complete rupture of a ligament. The majority of sprains require only conservative treatment and result in a complete resolution of symptoms with the serious ruptures may result in surgical intervention and possible ongoing discomfort.

Minor up to €14,800

Moderate - €16,900 to €23,400

Moderately Severe - €24,000 to €75,600

Severe and permanent conditions - €65,700 to €81,600

Dislocations

Severity depends on whether the dislocation is reduced spontaneously or whether a closed or open procedure had to be performed. Complications such as nerve and vein damage may also arise.

Minor - €22,100 to €50,400

Moderate - €39,200 to €87,300

Severe and permanent conditions - €55,200 to €93,400

Fractures – Patella

More serious injuries are those involving patella fractures where a severe level of ongoing disability exists, more common in displaced fractures. Displaced fractures usually require surgical treatment that may take a number of forms, including tension band wiring or removal of part or the entire knee cap (patellectomy).

Minor - €20,600 to €47,200

Moderate - €37,000 to €77,200

Severe and permanent conditions - €52,800 to €89,100

Lower Leg Fractures – Tibia and/or Fibula

This category includes fractures to both the tibia and fibula. A fracture to the fibula is usually not as severe as that of a tibia. Fractures that involve a joint are usually considered more complicated than others due to the increased impact on limb movement. Complications may arise such as fractures of both bones, which may include vein damage, soft tissue damage, mal-union, delayed union and nonunion and joint stiffness at either the ankle or knee or both. Open fractures (where the bone(s) break the skin) may be further complicated by infection. Peripheral nerve damage (peroneal nerve) may also be associated with these fractures.

Minor up to €49,400

Moderate - €40,500 to €70,400

Moderately Severe - €68,800 to €91,900

Severe and permanent conditions - €77,700 to €96,800

Feet

Accidents happen; following an injury to the feet, these are the approximate levels of compensation you could expect to acheive…

Foot

Foot sprains can result from twisting motions or hyperextension forces. The midfoot joints are the areas most often subject to sprains and strains. Foot sprains can be acute or chronic. Foot sprains are treated with the application of ice, possibly the use of walking aids during the acute phase, physiotherapy, protective taping, anti-inflammatory medication and possibly analgesics for pain depending on the severity of the injury

Soft Tissue -

Minor up to €20,000

Moderate - €19,900 to €38,400

Severe and permanent conditions - €36,400 to €54,400

Dislocations -

Minor - €16,300 to €43,700

Moderate - €31,900 to €71,500

Severe and permanent conditions - €47,700 to €77,500

Fractures

Simple foot fractures, non-displaced and even some displaced often do not need reduction. A full recovery is usually achievable. More serious fractures are those where prolonged treatment, permanent disability and/or future complications such as arthritis exist.

Minor - €18,000 to €34,900

Moderate - €34,000 to €61,200

Moderately Severe - €49,800 to €83,100

Severe and permanent conditions - €65,200 to €92,900

Crush Injuries – Foot

A crush injury is a serious type of injury and may include damage to the skin, a fracture, vein and nerve damage. Treatment of these major soft-tissue injuries may involve vein repair, nerve repair, debridement, repeated wound irrigations and skin grafts. Amputation may become necessary unless the neurovascular viability of the limb or part thereof is restored. Any associated fractures and other soft tissue damage such as ligament and tendon injuries will also require repair.

Minor - €12,800 to €40,900

Moderate - €14,500 to €73,900

Severe and permanent conditions - €26,600 to €78,300

Toes

The majority of toe dislocations are relatively minor where reduction is achieved by manipulation and followed up with a period of foot immobilisation in a cast. If reduction cannot be achieved by closed methods, an arthrotomy (surgical opening of a joint) may be required to achieve reduction.

Big Toe -

Minor - €11,000 to €18,800

Moderate - €15,500 to €42,400

Severe and permanent conditions - €27,500 to €46,800

Other Toe(s) -

Minor - €10,900 to €18,300

Moderate - €13,000 to €30,700

Severe and permanent conditions - €25,100 to €32,600

Fractures

Most toe fractures heal satisfactorily with conservative treatment. In some rare injuries, surgical intervention is required such as open reduction or a level of permanent disability may occur.

Big Toe -

Minor - €12,600 to €21,500

Moderate - €20,900 to €36,300

Severe and permanent conditions - €28,000 to €41,200

Other Toe(s) -

Minor - €10,900 to €20,300

Moderate - €13,000 to €32,800

Severe and permanent conditions - €25,100 to €33,700

Amputations

There are several factors that need to be considered when calculating the assessment. Such factors would include dominant foot, appearance, balance, age, gender and occupation impacts.

Toe (other than the Big Toe) up to €48,200

Big Toe up to €70,600

Head, Brain, Eyes, Face, Nose, Jaw and Teeth

Accidents happen; following an injury to the head, brain, eyes, face, nose, jaw and teeth, these are the approximate levels of compensation you could expect to acheive…

Concussion – Head Injury

Symptoms of a concussion injury commonly includes headaches, dizziness and nausea. Permanent symptoms may result but most cases recover.

Minor - up to €21,800

Moderate - €19,000 to €35,200

Severe - €41,600 to €74,000

Brain Damage

In the most severe cases the claimant will be in a vegetative state; there may be recovery of eye opening and some return of sleep and waking rhythm and postural reflex movements; no evidence of meaningful response to environment. Unable to obey commands; no language functions and need for 24-hour nursing care.

Minor - €500 to €25,000

Moderate - €25,000 to €350,000

Severe - Up to €550,000

Skull Fracture (no loss of consciousness)/Minor Head Injuries

Under this category there will be little if any disability resulting from the head injury.

Minor - up to €34,700 to €60,200

Moderate - €54,200 to €91,800

Severe and Permanent Conditions - €73,400 to €105,000

Skull Fracture (with loss of consciousness)/Moderate Head Injuries

This category will include an injury that would have had an impact on the state of consciousness.

Minor - up to €34,700 to €66,600

Moderate - €54,200 to €98,200

Severe and Permanent Conditions - €73,400 to €124,000

Skull Fracture (with loss of consciousness)/Severe Head Injuries

The severity of injury will depend on the degree of awareness and response to surroundings, the duration of unconscious state and any impact on personality or behaviour, once the injury has stabilised. There may be a greater risk of future epilepsy with this level of injury, which should also be considered.

Minor - up to €52,800 to €124,000

Moderate - €68,200 to €128,000

Severe and permanent conditions (excluding brain damage) - €87,400 to €144,000

Affecting Sight

Injuries in this category range from the most devastating where sight has been completely lost, through to transient injury to the eye with minimal impact on vision.

Minor Eye Injuries - €500 to €15,000

Loss of One Eye/Total Loss of Sight in One Eye - €80,000 to €120,000

Total Blindness - €270,000 to €400,000

Fracture of the Cheek

Cheek fractures (the zygoma bone) tend to be unilateral (i.e. one-side only) and result in flattening of the cheek. Eye socket fractures often accompany cheek fractures resulting in changes in appearance of the eyeball such as a sunken appearance. Nerve injuries are also often seen with cheek fractures sometimes leaving ongoing symptoms (e.g. tingling sensation) of the face. Le Forte fractures to the facial bones would also fall into this category

Minor - €21,200 to €42,200

Moderate - €37,700 to €47,300

Severe and permanent conditions - €47,500 to €55,600

Nose Fractures

Because of its prominence (and therefore vulnerability) and structural weakness, the nose is the most frequently fractured facial bone.

Minor - €18,000 to €22,100

Moderate - €22,100 to €32,200

Moderately Severe - €32,400 to €46,600

Severe and permanent conditions - €44,500 to €63,900

Jaw – Soft Tissue

A jaw sprain is an unusual sprain. This category is for sprains of the joint between the top and bottom jaws (the temporomandibular joint).

Minor - €11,000 to €20,800

Moderate - €19,500 to €27,600

Severe and permanent conditions - €25,900 to €52,700

Jaw – Dislocation

A jaw dislocation is a dislocation of the lower jawbone (mandible). Jaw dislocations are usually reduced by closed manipulation. Analgesics and a soft diet may be prescribed or even a cervical collar.

Minor - €21,200 to €35,400

Moderate - €36,100 to €63,300

Severe and permanent conditions - €52,700 to €68,600

Jaw – Fracture

After the nose, the jaw (mandible) is the most commonly fractured facial bone. Some jaw fractures may be very simple and require only observation and soft diet or with just bandage immobilisation but the more severe fractures will require internal fixation with the use of wires.

Minor - €21,200 to €47,100

Moderate - €35,900 to €74,900

Severe and permanent conditions - €52,700 to €80,200

Damage to the Teeth

For these injuries there will generally have been a course of treatment. The level of severity and amount will vary depending upon the degree of discomfort and the extent of such treatment. Any difficulty with eating is also a consideration.

Loss of Milk Tooth - €4,400 to €7,000

Broken Tooth - €7,500 to €10,300

Loss of One Tooth - €10,300 to €12,700

Our compensation estimator is a guide only as set out in the Personal Injuries Assessment Board’s Book of Quantum (updated 2016) outlining the General Guidelines as to the amounts that may be awarded or assessed in Personal Injury Claims. The abstract format of the official guidelines cannot take into account all the factors that will be considered when assessing your final compensation figure. These factors will include your loss of time, earnings, the long term impact of your injury and the effect of multiple injuries.